Montana Public Radio Commentary: The Courtier Society

By: Carl Graham, CEO, Montana Policy Institute

Thanksgiving always reminds me of an old Twilight Zone episode where the aliens show up in sparkly robes with gleaming big eyes and smiles all around. Their elongated fingers carry a book called “To Serve Man,” which everyone naturally assumes is a primer for saving us silly humans from our own ignorance and evil natures. This is during the Cold War, remember, when we all assumed we were going to blow each other to smithereens at any moment.

Naturally the best and the brightest humans start lining up for a trip to the home planet where further enlightenment undoubtedly awaits and a select few will be chosen as mankind’s benevolent overlords. It’s for our own good, of course.

Unfortunately, “To Serve Man” turns out to be a cookbook and the best and brightest are on the menu instead of the guest list.

Maybe it’s just the Thanksgiving tryptophan talking, but I think that’s where this country is headed as people and businesses line up for special treatment from an increasingly centralized and powerful government. At some point they’re going to find out that they’re dinners instead of diners.

We’re already seeing the increased influence exerted by just a few large special interests with access to political power resulting in more restrictions, regulations, and costs that disproportionately fall on small businesses and families, whose voices and opportunities to pursue happiness have grown relatively weaker in the process.

I could give you any number of examples, but let’s just use one that everybody has seen in the papers. The Dodd/Frank banking reform law was passed in the wake of a financial crisis that resulted in taxpayers bailing out big banks to the tune of billions of dollars and looking for someone to blame. Although many of its rules are still being written, we already know that the law includes massive increases in compliance, insurance and capital costs for banks, along with giving politically favored large institutions a de facto “too big to fail” designation.

It’s a law that was written for big bankers by big bankers. They can absorb the increased compliance costs while small banks with much lower margins can’t. They can meet the capital and insurance requirements that stifle small banks’ ability to make local loans to farmers and homebuyers. And of course with an implicit government guarantee, big banks enjoy much lower borrowing costs than small banks giving them even more of a competitive advantage.

The result is that we will soon see our community banks – those that survive anyway – become nothing more than storefronts and loan processors for the “too big to fail” banks that the government has chosen to guarantee. Decisions will be made based on checklists developed in New York and Washington D.C. rather than on personal relationships and local knowledge. Loan proceeds will be shipped out of the state and the big banks will increasingly feed the revolving door of the regulated and regulators until only those that can maintain their political access survive. Consumers will have fewer choices with higher costs, and will have to tailor their lives to meet one size fits all requirements if they want mortgages or small business loans.

But that’s not my point.

My point is that by massively centralizing and expanding government power we’re creating a courtier society, one where access to the King’s court is more important to success than merit or effort or risk taking. Now of course I’m not saying we’re creating a monarchy, but the effect is the same when power, influence and success come from proximity to the levers of power rather than from working hard and taking risks. The politically connected will always have access to power, and so the greater that power the more they will succeed at everyone else’s expense.

The result of this centralization and expansion of power is the systematic elimination of small business in this country. The barriers to entry are becoming so high and the cost of complying with regulation so onerous that would-be entrepreneurs are increasingly unable to make any return on their investments or even go about their daily business without risking fines, penalties, or jail.

Many existing businesses will simply close up shop as regulations and reporting requirements become too expensive or difficult to comply with. Job growth will dry up – especially at the low end of the income scale – as the costs of hiring new employees increase and government becomes a competitor for labor with new and expanded entitlement programs. New entrepreneurs will increasingly look at the barriers to entering the marketplace and the myriad of obstacles erected in their path and just go do something else. The risks and rewards of starting a new business will just not be worth it, especially if their success will be demonized in the increasingly popular political tactic of class warfare.

In a courtier society power is centralized and only that power decides who succeeds and who fails. Decisions are made based on proximity to the throne rather than merit, effort, or even the law. That is the direction we are headed as government becomes increasingly centralized, large, powerful and arbitrary.

The end of this path lies in a business/government partnership where large corporations operate under the umbrella and the thumb of government, and people trade their freedom for a monthly check. There’s a name for that, but I don’t want to be incendiary on this special holiday. Just take a look at Italy in the 1920s for a good example.

And have a Happy Thanksgiving while we still have much to be thankful for.

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For Immediate Release
930 Words

Carl Graham is CEO of the Montana Policy Institute, a nonprofit policy research and education center based in Bozeman.
He can be reached at:
67 W. Kagy Blvd., Ste. B
Bozeman, MT 59715
(406) 219-0508
cgraham@montanapolicy.org

Media Trackers Montana: 50 State Legislators Discuss Free Markets at Montana Policy Institute Forum

A total of 50 state legislators and approximately 130 people met this weekend to discuss free market principles for Montana.

The two-day event was hosted by the Montana Policy Institute (MPI) and focused on gearing up both state legislators and the general public for the upcoming 2013 legislature. The forum featured discussions and presentations on important issues for the upcoming legislature and was highlighted with a presentation by Wall Street Journal Editorial Board Member and Senior Economics Writer Stephen Moore.

Click here to continue article…

Montana Pig Tales

Once upon a time there was a wonderful land with untold riches. This land had fertile soil to grow more food than the locals could eat, gems and minerals that were sought after worldwide, trees for their houses and abundant fuel for their stoves. This wonderful land was filled with opportunity, and happy families prospered with each generation better off than the previous.
There were also helpful folks in the land’s Capitol City who worked for the happy families and did the kinds of things that everyone could benefit from. They built roads and schools and made sure everybody played by the same rules. And they kept the king in far-away DC Land from trying to run their lives. But then something happened, something awful and selfish.

The people in DC Land and Capitol City stopped working for the happy families and started ruling over them. They grew larger and larger and decided to regulate and tax and dictate more and more parts of the happy families’ lives. The land of opportunity became a land of limitations. Laws were passed to protect people from themselves instead of just from each other. Rules were made keeping the happy families from using all the riches that the land offered and pitting them against each other. The land with untold riches became one of the poorest in the kingdom. The happy families could no longer pass on opportunities they had enjoyed. And so the once-happy land got older and poorer, until finally the only people who could enjoy its beauty came from other places. The land of opportunity became a land of futility. And the once happy families were scattered to the winds.

Montana is still that happy land of opportunity, but we won’t pass that heritage along to our kids if we continue the current path of bigger government, more regulation, and control by Washington bureaucrats. We still have the riches that made Montana the Treasure State, but we’re losing the legacy of opportunity that those riches could provide. We increasingly have a government that has become its own special interest instead of our employee. And we’re being tied down with one size fits all solutions that may be great for New York or Mississippi, but not for Montana.

Welcome to “Pig Tales: Wasted Treasure in the Treasure State” — a one-stop shopping guide to Montana government. This is the second in a biennial look at Montana state government, our people, and our opportunities.

Our simple goal is help provide as much useful information as possible so that as the people who represent us make decisions that affect our lives and our families, we will have a confident and informed voice. Enjoy the tale!

Click here for full PDF (8MB!)

Interested in a hard copy or two? We’ll have them for purchase right here coming soon. Can’t wait? Call us at 406-219-0508 to place your order or email us at info@montanapolicy.org. In order to break even, we will be charging $3.50 for quantities up to 10 and $3.00/copy for quantities over 10. These prices include shipping and handling.

Press Release: Montana State and Local Public Employees Earn 15 Percent More in Total Compensation Than Private Sector Workers

Press Release
11/8/2012
For Immediate Release
Contact:
Glenn Oppel, Policy Director
Montana Policy Institute
406-443-4205
Summary:

Decision makers and taxpayers often hear that public employees earn less than private sector workers. In Montana, the State Human Resources Division’s latest biennial salary survey enforces this impression, concluding that public employees earn 13.3 percent less than comparable private sector counterparts. But the salary survey suffers from weaknesses in its methodology, omitting fringe benefits, comparing employees of unequal skill and experience, and evaluating public sector occupations that have no private sector equivalent (e.g. firefighters.) A new analysis from the Montana Policy Institute uses rigorous statistical analysis to compare public and private employees of similar personal and professional characteristics. They also calculate the compensation value of various fringe benefits. MPI’s new report “Public Versus Private Sector Compensation in Montana” finds that public employees earn 15.4 percent more than private sector counterparts in total annual compensation.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Montana State and Local Public Employees Earn 15 Percent More in Total Compensation Than Private Sector Workers

Bozeman – In a year when most state legislatures were engaged in budgetary belt-tightening, Montana Governor Brian Schweitzer and public employee union representatives agreed to a pay plan package that would cost taxpayers $138 million. According to the agreement, each of the next two years state workers would receive both a five percent raise in pay and a 10 percent increase in the state contribution toward health insurance premiums. After the pay plan agreement was reached, a local representative of theAmerican Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) argued that it was necessary to “bring us closer to being compensated fairly with those in the private sector.”

“Union representatives would have the public accept as conventional wisdom their caricature of the underpaid public employee,” responded Glenn Oppel, MPI Policy Director, “but the data suggest that public employees are actually compensated far more generously than their private sector counterparts.”

Much of the perception that public employees fail to earn as much as private sector counterparts is fueled by standard compensation comparisons. The State Human Resources Division’s biennial salary survey is a case in point. Salary data culled for the survey is used to determine what the state calls the “market midpoint” of compensation for 750 occupations within stategovernment.According to the salary survey, state workers are earning on average 13.3 percent less than the market midpoint.

“The state’s salary survey unfortunately suffers from a weakness in methodology,” emphasized Mr. Oppel.

By relying on salary ranges for occupational categories, the state’s report has grossly oversimplified the compensation question. For instance, many positions in the public sector, such as correctional officers and fire fighters, have no private-sector equivalent. Additionally, employees within these categories are not interchangeable; some are more educated, some are older, some are more experienced. Comparing only occupational categories ignores all of this variation. An additional shortcoming in the salary survey is that it doesn’t include the value of employee benefits – health insurance, paid leave, pension, etc. – which make up a considerable portion of any worker’s compensation.

To facilitate a more accurate comparison, the Montana Policy Institute has released a report that uses the “human capital” approach to achieve apples-to-apples comparisons between public and private sector pay.

“Our report starts by using government data to compare public and private employees of similar personal and professional characteristics,” explained Mr. Oppel. “For instance, instead of comparing pay in broad occupational categories, we compare public and private employees of similar work experience, education, gender, race, and disability status. Additionally, we calculate the annual compensation value of fringe benefits on top of annual wages.”

The results of the analysis are telling. Whereas the state’s salary survey concludes that that average state employee is earning 13.3 percent less than the market midpoint, the MPI report shows that when comparing similar employees, state and local public employees are in a statistical dead-heat with their private sector counterparts in terms of take-home pay.

Where state and local public employees surpass private sector workers in total annual compensation is from their various fringe benefits. When compensation from fringe benefits is factored in, state and local public employees earn nearly 15.4 percent more in total annual compensation than comparable private sector workers.

“We encourage lawmakers and state analysts to take a close look at the methodology we use in our report,” suggested Mr. Oppel. “It more accurately compares total annual compensation between public and private sector workers in Montana, which can better inform the decision making process on the state pay plan legislation.”

The full report is available on the MPI web site at http://www.montanapolicy.org/2012/11/public-vs-private-sector-compensation-in-montana-study-2012/.

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596 Words

 

The Montana Policy Institute is an independent, nonprofit policy research center based in Bozeman. It provides analysis and information to encourage individual freedom, personal responsibility, and free markets in Montana.

Montana Policy Institute
67 W Kagy Blvd, Ste. B
Bozeman, MT 59715
406-219-0508
MPI is a Montana tax exempt corporation operated exclusively for the public benefit.  No substantial part of the activities of the Institute are used for the carrying on of propaganda or otherwise attempting to influence legislation, promote any political campaign, or on behalf of or in opposition to any candidate for public office.

Montana Public Radio Commentary: Public vs. Private Pay

By Glenn Oppel, Policy Director, Montana Policy Institute

In a year when most state legislatures were engaged in budgetary belt-tightening, Montana Governor Brian Schweitzer and public employee union representatives agreed to a pay plan package that would make any private sector worker envious. According to the agreement, each of the next two years state workers would receive both a five percent raise in pay and a 10 percent increase in the state contribution toward health insurance premiums. The price tag is estimated at $138 million.

After the pay plan agreement was reached, a local representative of the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) argued that it was necessary to “bring us closer to being compensated fairly with those in the private sector.” Union representatives would have the public accept as conventional wisdom their caricature of the underpaid public employee, but the data suggest that public employees are actually compensated far more generously than their private sector counterparts.

Public sector unions have a vested interest in advancing the myth that they’re undercompensated, as it gives them more power at the bargaining table. But state analysts tasked with comparing public and private pay have been encouraging it as well. In June 2012, legislators on the Legislative Finance Committee received a report outlining the results of the State Human Resources Division’s biennial salary survey. Salary data culled for the survey is used to determine what the state calls the “market midpoint” of compensation for 750 occupations within state government. According to the salary survey, state workers are earning on average 13.3 percent less than the market midpoint.

The state analysts are far more likely to shoot straight than some union research shop, but their salary survey unfortunately suffers from a weakness in methodology. By relying on salary ranges for occupational categories, the state’s report has grossly oversimplified the compensation question. For instance, many positions in the public sector, such as correctional officers and fire fighters, have no private-sector equivalent. Additionally, employees within these categories are not interchangeable; some are more educated, some are older, some are more experienced. Comparing only occupational categories ignores all of this variation.

A final shortcoming in the salary survey is that it doesn’t include the value of employee benefits – health insurance, paid leave, pension, etc. – which make up a considerable portion of any worker’s compensation.

In sum, merely matching a state job to an occupational category will not yield apples-to-apples comparisons with private sector occupations and compensation. This is an argument that both conservative and liberal analysts have agreed upon when analyzing compensation in the public and private sector.

To facilitate a more accurate comparison, the Montana Policy Institute has released a report that uses the “human capital” approach to achieve apples-to-apples comparisons between public and private sector pay. Our report starts by using government data to compare public and private employees of similar personal and professional characteristics. For instance, instead of comparing pay in broad occupational categories, we compare public and private employees of similar work experience, education, gender, race, and disability status. Additionally, we calculate the annual compensation value of fringe benefits on top of annual wages, including pension, paid leave, and health insurance (including retiree health).

The results of the analysis are telling. Whereas the state’s salary survey concludes that that average state employee is earning 13.3 percent less than the market midpoint, our report shows that after adjusting for age, work experience, education, gender, race, and disability status, state and local public employees are in a statistical dead-heat with their private sector counterparts in terms of take-home pay. Where state and local public employees surpass private sector workers in total annual compensation is from their various fringe benefits. When compensation from fringe benefits is factored in, state and local public employees earn nearly 15.4 percent more in total annual compensation than comparable private sector workers.

Last session, lawmakers didn’t enact the previously-negotiated pay plan, citing concerns over revenue forecasts and challenges faced by private sector workers. With fiscal analysts projecting a $457 million surplus, union representatives will lobby vociferously this coming session for some follow through from legislators. Half a billion dollars seems like a lot of extra money, but our fiscal house is not exactly in order. As the Montana Policy Institute details in another study on Montana’s budget, there are long-term structural deficits that could break the bank in the near future, including unfunded liabilities of $3.8 billion in its pension programs for state workers and teachers.

This fiscal sleeping giant, and others, should be priority number one for lawmakers, and true solutions could easily consume whatever surplus materializes.

Thank you for listening. This is Glenn Oppel, Policy Director for the Montana Policy Institute.

The Montana Supreme Court Versus the Rule of Law

By Robert G. Natelson, Senior Fellow in Constitutional Jurisprudence, Montana Policy Institute

Click here for full study. (PDF – 3.77MB)

Executive Summary

There is a consensus among researchers that adherence to the rule of law is crucial to vigorous economic growth. Montana’s economy has lagged the economy of most of the United States since the 1980s, and this MPI Study explains one reason why: The Montana Supreme Court, the final authority in the state on most legal questions, has not honored the rule of law. Its failure to do so has harmed wealth and job creation in Montana.

In this Study, Professor Rob Natelson, the Institute’s Senior Fellow in Constitutional Jurisprudence, first examines what it means to honor the rule of law. He identifies five components: clarity, stability, notice, fairness, and restraint. He then shows how the rule of law is important to a state’s economy. The American Founders understood this, and Professor Natelson cites provisions they inserted into the U.S. Constitution to protect the rule of law.

He then explains why the Montana Supreme Court is more influential within state boundaries than most tribunals of its kind, giving it a significant impact on the Montana economy.

The heart of the Study is its comparison of rule-of-law standards with the court’s actual practices. The comparison is based partly on previous scholarly research and partly on a new case-by-case analysis of some of the court’s most important opinions. Professor Natelson concludes that the court frequently diverges from rule of law standards, and that this conduct presents a serious barrier to prosperity in Montana.

 

Montana’s Education Funding: A Fiscal Roadmap for Montana (2012)

By Curt Nichols, MPI Fellow

Click here for full study. (PDF – 3.4MB)

Executive Summary

Montana’s school funding and administration system is complex, and disappointing student outcomes indicate room for improvement. Those who wish to improve the system will need a basic understanding of these systems or their arguments and ideas will fall on deaf ears. Yet few people do understand these systems, the incentives they create or the forces that have led to their complexity.

Schools are financed by a mixture of state, federal, and local funds. District budgets are regulated by state statute with restrictions on local control to meet state constitutional mandates as interpreted by the courts. Governance is shared by the elected local board of trustees, the governor-appointed state board of public education, the legislature, and the elected superintendent of public instruction.

Montana’s constitution guarantees equity and adequacy in our education system. School district have successfully challenged the state’s funding system based on both these guarantees in separate actions over the past two decades. In response to the Montana Supreme Court’s equity ruling, variations between districts’ budgets have been limited, state funding has been increased, state subsidies have been targeted at districts with smaller relative property tax bases, and district budgeting practices have been revised. The adequacy ruling has resulted in new entitlements and increases in state funding. The overall effect has been an increase in school spending and a reduction in district-to-district spending variation.

Districts have varying expenses and resources that are based on differences in demographics and economic bases. Districts enroll varying proportions of low income and handicapped students. These students require additional resources. Districts also vary widely in their tax and non-tax revenue bases. These widely varying revenue bases lead to large differences in property tax rates between districts spending at only modestly different levels and keep spending near statutory minimum levels in some districts.

Montana students perform well when compared to other states. However, this good performance is partly due to demographic attributes characteristic to Montana, including fewer low income, minority, and English language learners that place fewer burdens on our schools than in more populous states. The large numbers of small, rural districts, which perform well with these groups, aid the state’s overall performance record. In spite of Montana’s solid performance record, it is important to consider the relative weakness of the United States education system in international comparisons as well as the failure of our schools to meet our own expectations. Many Montana students are inadequately prepared for post-secondary education. In particular, high percentages of low income and Indian students graduate without proficiency in mathematics and science.

The impact of equity and adequacy lawsuits has been primarily to increase funding for districts. The district judge in the adequacy case specifically excluded considering student performance as an indicator of funding adequacy despite the fact that national studies demonstrate that the link between funding levels and student performance is weak. Performance incentive programs in other states and advocated by the some federal education programs are based on a belief that incentives matter and can be used to improve schools and student outcomes. Montana does not have voucher or charter school programs and only minimal performance incentive funding. Despite support in numerous other states, the rejection of these programs is partially attributable to comfort with Montana’s relatively good current student performance on standardized tests. Interestingly, other states that have adopted performance-focused programs have learned that incentives matter and actually boost student outcomes.

This paper endeavors to help parents and policymakers better understand a complex education funding system in order to more effectively evaluate education policy in the future. Our hope is that Montana’s primary and secondary education system is not only the best in the nation in terms of academic performance but also the most efficiently managed and administered in terms of dollars and cents. Our children and taxpayers deserve no less.

Montana Taxpayers Foot the Bill for the Public Sector Pay Premium

By Glenn Oppel, Policy Director, Montana Policy Institute

In a year when most state legislatures were engaged in budgetary belt-tightening, Montana Governor Brian Schweitzer and public employee union representatives agreed to a pay plan package that would make any private sector worker envious. According to the agreement, each of the next two years state workers would receive both a five percent raise in pay and a 10 percent increase in the state contribution toward health insurance premiums. The price tag is estimated at $138 million.

After the pay plan agreement was reached, a local representative of the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) argued that it was necessary to “bring us closer to being compensated fairly with those in the private sector.” Union representatives would have the public accept as conventional wisdom their caricature of the underpaid public employee, but the data suggest that public employees are actually compensated far more generously than their private sector counterparts.

Public sector unions have a vested interest in advancing the myth that they’re undercompensated, as it gives them more power at the bargaining table. But state analysts tasked with comparing public and private pay have been encouraging it, also. In June 2012, legislators on the Legislative Finance Committee received a report outlining the results of the State Human Resources Division’s biennial salary survey. Salary data culled for the survey is used to determine what the state calls the “market midpoint” of compensation for 750 occupations within state government. According to the salary survey, state workers are earning on average 13.3 percent less than the market midpoint.

The state analysts are far more likely to shoot straight than AFSCME’s research shop, but their salary survey unfortunately suffers from a weakness in methodology. By relying on salary ranges for occupational categories, the state’s report has grossly oversimplified the compensation question. For instance, many positions in the public sector, such as correctional officers and fire fighters, have no private-sector equivalent. Additionally, employees within these categories are not interchangeable; some are more educated, some are older, some are more experienced. Comparing only occupational categories ignores all of this variation.

A final shortcoming in the salary survey is that it doesn’t include the value of employee benefits – health insurance, paid leave, pension, etc. – which make up a considerable portion of any worker’s compensation.

In sum, merely matching a state job to an occupational category will not yield apples-to-apples comparisons with private sector occupations and compensation. This is an argument that both conservative and liberal analysts have agreed with when analyzing compensation in the public and private sector.

To facilitate a more accurate comparison, the Montana Policy Institute has released a report that uses the “human capital” approach to achieve apples-to-apples comparisons between public and private sector pay. Our report starts by using government data to compare public and private employees of similar personal and professional characteristics. For instance, instead of comparing pay in broad occupational categories, we compare public and private employees of similar work experience, education, gender, race, and disability status. Additionally, we calculate the annual compensation value of fringe benefits on top of annual wages, including pension, paid leave, and health insurance (including retiree health).

The results of the analysis are telling. Whereas the state’s salary survey concludes that that average state employee is earning 13.3 percent less than the market midpoint, our report shows that after adjusting for age, work experience, education, gender, race, and disability status, state and local public employees are in a statistical dead-heat with their private sector counterparts in terms of take-home pay. Where state and local public employees surpass private sector workers in total annual compensation is from their various fringe benefits. When compensation from fringe benefits is factored in, state and local public employees earn nearly 15.4 percent more in total annual compensation than comparable private sector workers.

Last session, lawmakers didn’t act on the previously-negotiated pay plan, citing concerns over revenue forecasts and challenges faced by private sector workers. With fiscal analysts projecting a $457 million surplus, union representatives will lobby vociferously this coming session for some follow through from legislators. Half a billion dollars seems like a lot of extra money, but our fiscal house is not exactly in order. As the Montana Policy Institute details in another study on Montana’s budget, there are long-term structural deficits that could break the bank in the near future, including unfunded liabilities of $3.8 billion in its pension programs for state workers and teachers.

This fiscal sleeping giant, and others, should be priority number one for lawmakers, and true solutions could easily consume whatever surplus materializes.

 

In the Media:

Great Falls Tribune: http://www.greatfallstribune.com/article/20121112/OPINION/311120020/Montana-s-public-employees-earning-more-than-private-sector-counterparts

Missoulian: http://missoulian.com/news/opinion/columnists/state-public-employees-earn-more-than-private-sector-workers/article_9704997e-2f34-11e2-9530-0019bb2963f4.html

Havre Daily News: http://www.havredailynews.com/news/montanapublicemployeesearnmorethanprivatecounterparts.html

KGVO Missoula: http://newstalkkgvo.com/montana-public-workers-earn-more-than-their-private-sector-counterparts/

MTPR Evening Edition Commentary: http://www.mtpr.org/podcasts/audio/mtee_newscasts/11-15-2012Newscast.mp3 (at 20:30)

Montana Watchdog: http://watchdog.org/61693/oppel-montana-public-employees/

Media Trackers: http://montana.mediatrackers.org/category/analysis/

UnionWatch.org: http://unionwatch.org/union-watch-highlights-102/

Media Trackers Montana: New Study Says State Employees Receive 15% More in Total Compensation than Private Sector Workers

A new study released by the Montana Policy Institute (MPI) shows that employees of the state of Montana receive 15 percent more in total compensation than employees in the state’s private sector.

Unlike Montana’s State Human Resources Division’s biennial salary survey, the MPI study on public and private wages in the state includes fringe benefits and compares total compensation to private sector equivalents.

Click here to continue article…

3rd Biennial MPI Legislative Forum

In preparation for the 2013 Legislative Session, Montana Policy Institute is bringing national, state, & local experts together for a discussion of budget reform, fiscal discipline, government transparency, education policy, & property rights and providing practical alternatives to return growth and prosperity to Montana. Our Friday evening dinner forum keynote will be Stephen Moore, Editorial Board Member and Senior Economics Writer at The Wall Street Journal.

The event will take place at the Great Northern Hotel in Helena on November 16 & 17, 2012. Please see the link below for the event homepage and to register. Early registration is highly encouraged as we are expecting a full house. Early bird rates available until Wednesday, 11/7.

3rd Biennial Montana Policy Institute Legislative Forum – November 16-17. 2012

Interested in becoming a sponsor? Check out our sponsorship page for more details and secure online sign up or contact our Bozeman office at (406)219-0508 or at info@montanapolicy.org.